Shiny Darkly


MUSIC

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Bronze

Release Date: Feb 15, 2019
Label: Crunchy Frog

PRESS RELEASES

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February 21, 2019

SHINY DARKLY SHARE "MONK IN DOUBT" VIDEO VIA UNDER THE RADAR | BRONZE LP OUT NOW VIA CRUNCHY FROG

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January 22, 2019

Shiny Darkly Share "Perfect" Video Via The 405 | 'Bronze' LP Out 2/15/19 Via Crunchy Frog

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BIOGRAPHY

When bronze oxidizes, the brass shine of its surface is replaced by a matt, blue-green patina. First in isolated spots, but eventually covering its entirety. It’s temporarily an object of contrasts; eventually something altogether different. Shiny Darkly – literally true to their name – have undergone a similar process on this, their sophomore album.

With their post-punk roots as the point of departure, they have investigated spoken word, desperado jazz, dub, noise, and techno. Their stylistic explorations have seen them trying on various guises – using different names and different instrumentation as short-lived live outfits with the sole purpose of investigating new sides of themselves. In sessions with producers – Jens Benz (Iceage, Yung, Omar Soleyman) and Nis Bysted (Marching Church, Lower, Thulebasen) – Shiny Darkly cemented these explorations. The result is essentially a band reborn; and Bronze is the proof:

From the get-go, the album demonstrates the band’s new breadth of sound: Bronze opens with New Country sounding like a collaboration between Ennio Morricone and a smacked-out Frank Sinatra, followed by Perfect – an acerbic hymn that feels as if Suicide was tasked with soundtracking the present. Nearing the record’s halfway mark, Monk in Doubt has the band sounding as if The Birthday Party had made a record with Diplo. The second-to-last track, Tango, sounds like all of the above meeting at Berghain at 6AM, and the disjointed percussive elements and the soaring guitar line of closer, Time as a Person, is sunshine bursting through the windows of a smoke-filled room – a jolt of light and a promise of inevitable change. For all its eclectic playfulness Bronze remains coherent throughout – by the time the album ends, the oxidized patina covers the whole thing.

To stick to the initial metaphor, the core is still Shiny Darkly: Mads Lassen's tastefully solid and subtly innovative drums and percussion, Oliver Matthew Volz's distinctive bass and synths, and, on top of that, Kristoffer Bech's vocal delivery and guitar work. Over the years, his already distinctive voice has grown, fitting in somewhere between McCulloch, Curtis, and Cave, and yet utterly, singularly, his own. Likewise, the band as a unit is unlike anything else out there these days.

Bronze also showcases some fine guest star performances from future-soul singer Jada, Anders Malta with his jazzy horns, and composer, pianist, and former keyboard side-man in the band, Kristian Marstal.

When bronze oxidizes, the brass shine of its surface is replaced by a matt, blue-green patina. First in isolated spots, but eventually covering its entirety. It’s temporarily an object of contrasts; eventually something altogether different. Shiny Darkly – literally true to their name – have undergone a similar process on this, their sophomore album.

With their post-punk roots as the point of departure, they have investigated spoken word, desperado jazz, dub, noise, and techno. Their stylistic explorations have seen them trying on various guises – using different names and different instrumentation as short-lived live outfits with the sole purpose of investigating new sides of themselves. In sessions with producers – Jens Benz (Iceage, Yung, Omar Soleyman) and Nis Bysted (Marching Church, Lower, Thulebasen) – Shiny Darkly cemented these explorations. The result is essentially a band reborn; and Bronze is the proof:

From the get-go, the album demonstrates the band’s new breadth of sound: Bronze opens with New Country sounding like a collaboration between Ennio Morricone and a smacked-out Frank Sinatra, followed by Perfect – an acerbic hymn that feels as if Suicide was tasked with soundtracking the present. Nearing the record’s halfway mark, Monk in Doubt has the band sounding as if The Birthday Party had made a record with Diplo. The second-to-last track, Tango, sounds like all of the above meeting at Berghain at 6AM, and the disjointed percussive elements and the soaring guitar line of closer, Time as a Person, is sunshine bursting through the windows of a smoke-filled room – a jolt of light and a promise of inevitable change. For all its eclectic playfulness Bronze remains coherent throughout – by the time the album ends, the oxidized patina covers the whole thing.

To stick to the initial metaphor, the core is still Shiny Darkly: Mads Lassen’s tastefully solid and subtly innovative drums and percussion, Oliver Matthew Volz’s distinctive bass and synths, and, on top of that, Kristoffer Bech’s vocal delivery and guitar work. Over the years, his already distinctive voice has grown, fitting in somewhere between McCulloch, Curtis, and Cave, and yet utterly, singularly, his own. Likewise, the band as a unit is unlike anything else out there these days.

Bronze also showcases some fine guest star performances from future-soul singer Jada, Anders Malta with his jazzy horns, and composer, pianist, and former keyboard side-man in the band, Kristian Marstal.

Read More